In Case of Emergency

You’ve seen the news about Japan’s earthquakes. You know about the typhoons. And by now, you’ve probably heard that your neighbor is an extremely active volcano. All this information would cause anyone to be nervous. Lucky for you, we have some resources to ease your worried mind.

The Prefectural Website has compiled an extensive list of links on how to handle your next natural disaster. You can find that list HERE. Resources include

  • How to prepare an emergency kit
  • How to evacuate
  • What to do in an earthquake, typhoon, eruption or tsunami such as:

A Tip for Drivers – if you find yourself in a car during an earthquake:

  1. Pull over to the side of the road
  2. Turn off the engine, turn on the radio for updates
  3. Put on your emergency brake/hand brake
  4. Stay in the vehicle until shaking stops
  5. You can exit the car once the shaking stops

IF YOU FEEL UNSAFE IN THE WORKPLACE

The prefectural website also has a list of contacts to report any kind of workplace harassment. CLAIR also offers counseling for long-term issues. You can find those HERE.

Finally, here is a quick list of emergency numbers to have on hand in case of the worst. They can also be found on the Prefectural Website:

  • Police (keisatsu / 警察) 110
  • Ambulance (kyuukyuusha / 救急車) 119
  • Fire (shoubousha / 消防車) 119
    • From green pay phones: Lift the receiver, push the red emergency button, and dial.
    • From grey pay phones: Lift the receiver and dial.

 

9 Ways to Enjoy and Appreciate Your Island Placement

01
Kurasaki Beach
  1. Appreciate the uniqueness of Japanese island life. You probably didn’t ask to be placed on a remote island, right? There are very few island placements, and you got one of them! It’ll be all right. You get the special experience of living in a place that is so different from the Japan that everyone knows. And your backyard might be a beach.
02
Tokunoshima Scuba Diving – Credit to Micah Mizukami

 

2. Pick up a water sport. You can snorkel, dive, surf, do SUP, or more than one! You may even make some local friends while out on the water, too.

03
My first hula class

3. We are always on 島時間 down here. If you are stuck behind a truck full of sweet potatoes and end up being late for something, blame it on island time.

4. Join a local cultural activity in your community like shamisen, eisa, or hula. Dont feel too bad about missing out on all the fun culture events on the mainland. The islands have plenty of culture, too!

5. It is so exciting when you have the chance to go to the mainland. Going to _Uniqlo or Starbucks in Amu Plaza is all the more exciting when you have to take a plane or overnight ferry to get there!

 

 

04
Islanders love Starbucks

6. Islander bonding. Even if you are on an island by yourself, you still have the other islanders who understand you.  And you can always hop on the ferry and visit another island for the weekend. Your Island card helps you save a little money on travel costs.

05
Ready for Mangroves!

7. Island life is cheap. You will probably save a lot of money living down here. Unless you spend all your paycheck on island mangoes. Those are like 2000 yen for just one.

8. Island people are ridiculously nice. One time we asked for directions to a restaurant at a gas station on Okinoerabu, and the guy got in his car and had us follow him so he could show us the way.

06
Bashayama Beach

9. When it’s summertime, you are living in a tropical paradise. Most tourists skip us and head right to Okinawa, so a crowded day at the beach can sometimes mean you are sharing the sand with 5 other people.

Enjoy!

 

Becca Simas is a 1st year ALT on Amami Oshima

My Wednesday at a Senior High School

With the influx of new JETs arriving, I thought it prudent to write my own “A Day in the Life” blog.

As a prefectural ALT, I was assigned to a senior high school a few weeks before I arrived. At first I was nervous. As a fresh college grad, the idea of teaching and working with a group of students so close to my own age was extremely daunting. But as anything in life goes, you have to grab the bull by the horns and just go.

After almost a year working here, I`ve grown to love not only the job but the staff and students as well. I`ve also developed a routine that may vary a bit depending on my class load, but only slightly. I chose a Wednesday to write about because that is usually the most eventful day.

8:30 – Morning Assembly

This happens every week. I get to school, drop my things off on my desk, and hustle down the hall to either the gym or the Kendo hall, where the entire school or separate grades meet respectively. They`ll talk about events, sports, awards, expectations, and do uniform checks. I observe quietly and bow when necessary, which is very often.

8:45- Homeroom, Prep Time

Everyone returns to their desks in the staff room, and the homeroom teachers go to their classes for a short meeting. If I don`t have a class first or second period, I will enjoy a cup of coffee and maybe an okashi that a teacher has brought back from a trip. When I finish, I will have a myriad of things to do. Usually this includes correcting papers for the JTEs, answering their questions, thinking extremely deeply about colloquial English as a result, and planning lessons. Depending on my schedule, I may have a lot of activities to plan.

10:55 Class Time

Usually I have 3rd period classes for some reason. Lately, I`m allowed to teach on my own for anywhere from 20 minutes to the full class period. It all depends on the JTE, the lesson, and even the time of the year. When I first started, I had 1-2 classes per week. Now I have upwards of 10-15.

11:45 Break

Class ends and I return to the staff room. Again, depending on if I have class or not, I will read or study Japanese. Sometimes I will have 10 minutes to get to my next class. It truly does depend. To note further, if it is exam time during that week, I will have the entire day free. I bring books and study materials. They`re essential, and you might as well spend your time productively.

12:45 Lunch. Omiyage Distribution.

Self explanatory. I eat. We all eat, assuming we have time. I have seen teachers go until after 4:30 before they can touch their lunch, though. This is also a popular time for teachers to give omiyage if they are providing for the whole staff. Those are my favorite days. This is also time that the travel agencies bring their pamphlets and business cards around, and when the Nissay lady comes by with snacks and advertisements. Furthermore, there is a little old woman that sells individual yogurts to our staff room.

1:30 Class Time, Probably

Self explanatory. If this is free time, sometimes I will ask a JTE if it is alright if I run to the bank or the post office.

2:20 Cleaning Time

Students and teachers will clean the school for 20 minutes. I am in charge of sweeping the English department and the Math department. 5 other students help me sweep, clear garbage, and clean the sinks. This is supposed to teach everyone discipline and cooperation and the value of caring for your surroundings. During special long cleaning time, students and teachers even change into their athletic clothes to do this (read: WINDBREAKERS and of course I own one). After this, I continue prep or go to class.

4:15 Leaving Time

I never leave at 4:15. Never. On the rare day that I absolutely MUST leave at my scheduled time in order to pick up something or travel, I feel guilty. The Japanese are known for their hard work, and that doesn’t end in the classroom. Teachers get out at 4:50 but many will stay well past 6 or 7. If I have English Club (Tuesday), I will end up leaving at 6:15. However, I usually end the day at 4:30 or 4:40. This week I had a lot of prep to do so I ended up staying till 5:15 for a few days.

Keep in mind that this is not required. There is an understanding that you`re a foreign member of the staff and you are absolutely not required to work overtime, especially since you are not paid for it. If you want to arrive at 8:30 exactly and leave at 4:15 every day, go for it. Just do not be late and do not leave early unless you get explicit permission or want to take nenkyu, or paid leave.

Every situation is different. This will not be your day to a T, as it is uniquely mine. However, I hope this gives you a rough idea of what to expect as a teacher at the senior high school. Good luck!

christine Christine Zawlocki is a 2nd year ALT in Kanoya, Kagoshima