In Case of Emergency

You’ve seen the news about Japan’s earthquakes. You know about the typhoons. And by now, you’ve probably heard that your neighbor is an extremely active volcano. All this information would cause anyone to be nervous. Lucky for you, we have some resources to ease your worried mind.

The Prefectural Website has compiled an extensive list of links on how to handle your next natural disaster. You can find that list HERE. Resources include

  • How to prepare an emergency kit
  • How to evacuate
  • What to do in an earthquake, typhoon, eruption or tsunami such as:

A Tip for Drivers – if you find yourself in a car during an earthquake:

  1. Pull over to the side of the road
  2. Turn off the engine, turn on the radio for updates
  3. Put on your emergency brake/hand brake
  4. Stay in the vehicle until shaking stops
  5. You can exit the car once the shaking stops

IF YOU FEEL UNSAFE IN THE WORKPLACE

The prefectural website also has a list of contacts to report any kind of workplace harassment. CLAIR also offers counseling for long-term issues. You can find those HERE.

Finally, here is a quick list of emergency numbers to have on hand in case of the worst. They can also be found on the Prefectural Website:

  • Police (keisatsu / 警察) 110
  • Ambulance (kyuukyuusha / 救急車) 119
  • Fire (shoubousha / 消防車) 119
    • From green pay phones: Lift the receiver, push the red emergency button, and dial.
    • From grey pay phones: Lift the receiver and dial.

 

Renting a Car Over Buying: An ALT’s Experience

Besides buying a car outright, renting one is also an option. I ended up renting my car after the one from my predecessor was no longer running, but the process may differ for other people. One of my JTEs remembered the name of a company in Kokubu (World Motors Kokubu) and called them for me. After getting a ride to their showroom and looking at a car they had, the company owner offered to let me do a long-term rental instead of buying. I paid about 10,000Y per month for the first year I rented, but my car insurance was paid separately.

What I liked about renting was that any maintenance (shakken particularly) on the car is covered by my rental contract, and that I could pay year by year instead of all at once. The downsides to renting were that I had to switch cars a few times, and because they’re rented cheaply the car models are  much older than you might buy from a dealer. If you’re sure of only staying in Japan for one year or think renting might be for you, ask your supervisor about options from companies in your area

 

lauraLaura Boville is a 2nd year ALT in Kanoya, Kagoshima.